Paper Chasing

Posted by Droolees Ed Team on

 As an adult, you have probably noticed how certain habits in your life today were habits you had when you were a child. You might be thankful for the good habits and regret the bad ones, nevertheless, we can recognize the power of our actions even at a young age.

One habit that has been a part of my life now is how I manage my money. I remember when I was younger, my parents were careful on how they spent their money. They were simple people, never looking for the latest gadget or best clothing brand. Even until this day (any clothing, furniture, or kitchen things) they find ways to reuse or recycle them. Something I admire about my dad is that he will spend his time figuring out how to fix something, even if he could easily call someone to fix whatever is broken. I’ve always watched him and helped when I could, sometimes even thinking of different ways to make things work and he’d ask how I knew how to solve the problem. It’s one of my favorite moments with him because he’s surprised and also proud of me.

My mom takes cares of things like they’re gold. Her kitchen appliances will last for years because she treats everything with care. It’s not that we couldn’t afford something better, but she is really great at making things last. So why am I sharing about my parents and money? One of the most valuable lessons I have taken to heart is the importance of knowing how to spend my money. Growing up, if someone gifted me money, I’d save it. I didn’t know what I was saving it for, but I just wanted to save. Little did I know how that habit would impact the decisions I make today as an adult.

I don’t crave a life of luxury, in fact, I like the idea of living a minimalistic lifestyle. In my daily life, I see how keeping things simple helps me be more at peace. When I received my first paycheck as a teacher, I felt rich. I could buy whatever I wanted (after paying rent and other things, of course.) However, I let the excitement pass because I knew that whatever decision I made at that moment, it would also influence how I’d invest my money for the future. My friends ask me how I can afford going back to school without taking out a loan. It’s because of the little decisions I decided to make while I was teaching. I saved as much as I could so that one day, I could go back to school without worrying about being in debt. I was blessed to have my teaching job, and blessed to have a liking for economizing. I learned to economize, not as an adult, but as a kid.

The hunger for money is great in our world. It always has been and it has continued to tear relationships. Money in itself is not evil. Money is a gift and it can be used to bless others. Investing in that which is valuable is an important lesson that should be taught to our youth. Helping them to keep an account of purchases they make with their own money can teach them the value and use of money. It encourages them to economize and invest. Without a shadow of a doubt, your children will remember specific events in their life that taught them lessons. Some lessons can hurt. Promote that which is good so that in the future, they will grow up to be adults who will appreciate the investment you made in them.

A king named Solomon was known to be one of the richest men on earth. When he was granted a wish, he didn’t ask for more riches or kingdoms. He asked for wisdom. The highly admired king valued wisdom more than gold. It is important that we teach the younger generation to chase after wisdom. Our world is always paper chasing, and while money may solve many of our problems, the examination of our heart and mind can lead us to become a better people for this world, and for future generations. The investments you make today, will shape your generations to come. Ready, set, chase after that which is good.

Share with us in the comments below examples of how your family invested in you when you were a child and how those investments impacted you today.

 

Written By Teresa Alberto

Droolees Ed Team Blog Contributor

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